Melanoma/Skin Cancer Detection

It’s not surprising that as we close out May and head into June it signifies both the official kickoff to summer and Skin Cancer Awareness month. It’s a great reminder to protect your skin while enjoying the beautiful outdoors. Whether it’s a day at the pool, a barbecue with friends or simply driving in the car, protecting your skin from the harmful effects of the sun is important not only during the summer, but all year long. Long, light-filled days at the beach often also mean overexposure to the sun’s dangerous ultraviolet (UV) radiation, which can wreak havoc on your skin, eyes, and immune system. Avoiding too much sun, covering up, and using sunscreen is the key to preventing skin cancer. Early detection is important too. When skin cancer is caught early, it is usually treatable

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Lupus Awareness Month

Lupus is a chronic autoimmune disease. Chronic means that the signs and symptoms tend to last longer than six weeks and often for many years. The Month of May is Lupus Awareness Month and I hope to raise awareness and educate others about this life changing disease. In a healthy immune system, the body produces antibodies which destroy unhealthy cells such as bacteria, viruses and foreign waste. However, lupus causes an overactive immune system to produce auto antibodies which attacks healthy body tissue. This can affect most parts of the body including any organ.

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Arthritis Awareness Month

Arthritis affects an estimated 50 million U.S. adults and continues to be the most common cause of disability in the United States. Arthritis is an umbrella term used to describe over 100 medical conditions and diseases, known as rheumatic diseases. Rheumatologists are physicians who are specifically trained to treat rheumatic diseases, and seeing a rheumatologist early after diagnosis of arthritis is your best defense against this disease.

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April is Autism Awareness Month

President Barack Obama issued a White House proclamation recognizing World Autism Awareness Day declaring that “everyone deserves a fair shot at opportunity” and celebrating the work of advocates, professionals, family members, and all who work to build brighter tomorrows alongside those with autism. The President highlighted the signing of the Autism CARES Act, which dedicates $1.3 billion in federal funding for autism over the next five years and the ongoing BRAIN initiative to revolutionize our understanding of conditions like autism and improve the lives of all who live with them.”

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Colorectal Cancer

Colorectal cancer is the fourth most common cancer in the United States and the second leading cause of death from cancer. Since then, it has grown to be a rallying point for the colon cancer community where thousands of patients, survivors, caregivers and advocates throughout the country join together to spread colon cancer awareness by wearing blue, holding fundraising and education events, talking to friends and family about screening and so much more. As part of colon cancer awareness we raise awareness about colorectal cancer and take action toward prevention.

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National Endometriosis Awareness Month

Endometriosis Awareness takes place across the globe during the month of March with a mission to raise awareness of “the invisible disease”, which affects an estimated 176 million women. Thanks to the Endometriosis Association, women, girls, and families all over the world have a wealth of information and resources to turn to when coping with endometriosis. Compared to the lack of information and support in 1980–the year the Association was founded– it is a strikingly different world. Yet, despite much progress, endometriosis is still a complex and puzzling disease that has no real cure.

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Eating Disorders

Eating disorders are real, treatable medical illnesses. They frequently coexist with other illnesses such as depression, substance abuse, or anxiety disorders. Eating disorders frequently appear during the teen years or young adulthood but also may develop during childhood or later in life. Eating disorders such as anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and binge-eating disorder, and their variants, all feature serious disturbances in eating behavior and weight regulation. They are associated with a wide range of adverse psychological, physical, and social consequences.

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Women & Heart Disease

February is American Heart Month.The leading cause of death in the United States continues to be cardiovascular disease (CVD), which includes heart disease, hypertension (high blood pressure), and stroke. Both men and women have heart attacks, but more women who have heart attacks die from them. Treatments can limit heart damage but they must be given as soon as possible after a heart attack starts. Ideally, treatment should start within one hour of the first symptoms.

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National Birth Defects Prevention Month

January is National Birth Defects Prevention Month, a time to focus on raising awareness about the frequency with which birth defects occur in the United States and of the steps that can be taken to prevent them. While not all birth defects can be prevented, there are things a women can do get ready for a healthy pregnancy. This is important because many birth defects happen very early during pregnancy, sometimes before a woman even knows she is pregnant. There are some steps a woman can take to get ready for a healthy pregnancy.

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Cervical Health Awareness Month

Happy New Year! January is a great time to get our health in-check and start new habits. It’s also Cervical Health Awareness Month, a reminder to schedule a checkup with your gynecologist to be sure you are up to date on your cervical cancer testing Health Awareness Month is a chance to raise awareness about how women can protect themselves from HPV (human papillomavirus) and cervical cancer. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) each year approximately 12,000 women in the United States get cervical cancer and over 4,000 women die from the disease. As many as 93% of cervical cancers cases could be prevented through cervical cancer screening and HPV vaccination.

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